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An Open Letter to Horror Movie Directors

29 January 2010 by TB One Comment

Feigning credibility by pretending your film and idea is real does not work. People such as Whitley Strieber and Richard Hoagland may echo my sentiment when I beg you to stop pretending your great spooky idea may be based on real events. There is a genre called science fiction and horror for a reason. The operative word there is fiction. Just because you shoot something in first person doc style with a handheld and infrared does not warrant true story. Tell a fictional tale and get us interested in your story. Use dialogue and suspense rather than shaky cameras and douchebag home videos of people being scared. I assure you, the art of storytelling is alive and well in this era of cheap and easy pseudo-reality TV style of filmmaking. Barring very few exceptions, your idea will be lame, void of tension and overall tripe. Moreover, the subject in which you dabble happens to be a legitimate science and your mockery of such lessens its credibility.

So, I implore you: Like the great science fiction writers before you, spin a gripping, scary yarn of ghosts or aliens without the use of cheap mockumentary tactics. You might find yourself with a great work that will last the ages and may become part of our spooky subconscious lexicon rather than a hokey made for TV style spoof. Things go bump in the night followed by murky shadows in our bedroom every night. Lets put down the handicam and lay there, afraid.

One Comment »

  • mike said:

    your name is the worst. shameful.

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